Tompkins Cortland Community College

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College Secures $60K in Funding for Local Workforce Development Training

September 23, 2016

Employees at four organizations in Tompkins and Cortland counties will be upgrading their skills and improving their job performance, thanks to $60,000 worth of grants Tompkins Cortland Community College has secured from the SUNY Community College Workforce Development Training program. The competitive grants are designed to provide workforce development training programs that support the creation and retention of employment opportunities in the state and local community. The training for the local organizations will be done by BIZ, part of Tompkins Cortland Community College’s Corporate and Community Partnerships initiative that offers training programs both for individuals seeking to develop skills and for companies seeking customized training solutions in a variety of areas, including manufacturing, leadership, technology, and customer service.

This marks the 11th year the college has won SUNY Workforce Development Grants to help local businesses. This year’s training programs will reach 730 individuals, bringing the total number of people served over the past 11 years to nearly 8,000. Combined, the grants have provided for more than $850,000 worth of training for organizations in Tompkins and Cortland counties.

Strategic Corporate and Community Partnerships Director Martha Hubbard worked with local organizations to design training programs aligned with critical business needs, and then applied for the training grants. "A crucial part of the service we provide to our community is working with organizations to identify skill gaps. We work with organizations to determine needs, and then customize training programs to address those needs. With the programs being partially funded through the SUNY grants, the training is provided to the organizations at a fraction of what it normally would cost. It allows these organizations to afford the training they need to continue to thrive and remain vital in our community."

The training supported by the SUNY grants will assist five organizations and will be completed by June 2017.

The grant award recipients, location; grant total; and brief description:
• Ames Linen, Cortland; $4,704; group leader communication training
• Cortland Regional Medical Center, Cortland; $30,000; communication and customer services training for quality improvement in patient care
• Stork H&E Turboblading, Ithaca; $12,157; CNC programming and supervisory development
• Tompkins Financial, Ithaca; $13,139; training on managing and maximizing the multi-generational workforce

More information on customized training, non-credit professional development workshops, and grant funding is available by contacting Biz at 607.844.6586 or mmh@tompkinscortland.edu


Childcare Center Campaign Kicks Off

September 20, 2016

The Tompkins Cortland Community College Foundation has kicked off the public phase of its campaign to raise money to build a new childcare center on the College’s campus. The entire project will cost $5.5 million, with $4.5 million already secured through state support and a lead gift from Arthur Kuckes.

The Arthur Kuckes Childcare Center will replace the College’s current childcare center and greatly enhance the capabilities to serve students and the community. The new center will nearly triple the capacity to 80 children, will expand the age-range served to include infants, and strengthen the College’s Early Childhood academic program by offering more internship and training opportunities. The Early Childhood program historically is a vital supplier of staff for childcare centers in the Tompkins and Cortland County communities, and the Arthur Kuckes Childcare Center will be a prime learning lab for students in that program.

The fundraising campaign will raise money to create an operating endowment, which will in turn allow the center to provide income-based, affordable childcare for our students and community. Construction is expected to begin in 2017 with opening hoped for in late 2018.

The Tompkins Cortland Community College Foundation is a not-for-profit entity separate from the College with the sole purpose of supporting the efforts of the College. Fore more information the Foundation and the childcare center, visit the Foundation website.


College Invites Community to Family Friendly Show

September 15, 2016

Tompkins Cortland Community College will host a magic and comedy show by John Cassidy on Wednesday, September 28 at 7 p.m. The event will be held in the Student Center on the Dryden campus, and is free and open to the public.

John Cassidy is a professional comedian, magician, and balloon artist who holds several Guinness World Records® for balloon sculpting speed. He has appeared numerous times on television as either a stand-up comedian, magician or as a Guinness Book of Records® celebrity. He has been a guest on Late Night with Conan O'Brien, Martha Stewart Living, The Weakest Link, NBC's Today Show, and Live with Regis and Kelly. He also is a frequent performer aboard Disney Cruise Lines and has performed at the White House five times.

The show at Tompkins Cortland is organized by the College’s Student Activities office and is funded by the student activity fee.


Registration Open for Leadership Cortland 2016-17

July 13, 2016

Cortland County residents looking for the opportunity to develop leadership skills and contribute to community vitality by serving on board and committees should consider taking part in the 2016-17 Leadership Cortland program. Applications are now being accepted for the program, which is a joint effort of Tompkins Cortland Community College and the Cortland County Chamber of Commerce.

Leadership Cortland, founded in 1996, brings together diverse groups of citizens who share the interests of developing their leadership skills and improving their community. With representatives from a cross section of business, industry, education, non-profit and government organizations, Leadership Cortland educates about the strengths and challenges of Cortland County while teaching about individual styles, leadership, and teamwork. In addition to monthly sessions and a two-day retreat, participants also work as teams to identify community issues and develop community action projects to address them. Past projects have included “Cortland to the Core” with a video to promote the county, a Forever Fit website, Backpacks for Foster Kids, the development of Chill-A-Bration, PB&J Weekend Food program, and the creation of EPICC – Empowered Professionals of Cortland County.

"We have surveyed our Leadership alumni and learned that the vast majority are now serving, or have served, on local boards," says Leadership Cortland Director Martha Hubbard. "Many have been involved in founding a new organization or board in our area. Several others have assumed leadership roles on area committees and projects since graduating from the program, while others have utilized their new skills and knowledge to advance in their workplace."

People interested in Leadership Cortland should contact the College’s Cortland Extension Center at 607.756.5275 for the application and more information.


Spring 2016 Dean's List Released

June 30, 2016

Tompkins Cortland Community College has released the Dean’s List for the Spring 2016 semester. Provost and Vice President of the College John Conners announced a total of 429 students have received the honor. The Dean’s List recognizes matriculated students who have demonstrated high academic achievement by attaining a GPA of 3.5 or better while completing at least 12 credit hours during the semester. For part-time matriculated students, they are eligible each time they complete a block of 12 hours with a minimum GPA of 3.5.

New York State

Alpine

  • Rebecca J Cousins
  • Redouane Elghazi

Apalachin

  • Ryan Ceruti
  • Justin H Cheress
  • Abigail M Holmes

Aurora

  • Marie B Dentes
  • Frederick R Semenza

Bainbridge

  • Nathaniel R Greene

Bath

  • Jonathan McDonald
  • Matthew C Socola

Bemus Point

  • Lindsey C Walters

Berkshire

  • Antoinette M Benjamin
  • Alexander A Knapp
  • Denise M Lopez
  • Kylieray M Stephens
  • Cassandra J Willard

Binghamton

  • Sarah Ryan
  • Deidra E Walker

Bronx

  • Brittany Henry
  • Bria Williams

Brooklyn

  • Kaseem Andrews

Brooktondale

  • Brenna R Burlingame
  • Tucker T Davis
  • Stephen R Fisher
  • Tara Schiel
  • Abbie M Smith

Cambria Heights

  • Cristina A Taylor

Campbell

  • James C Overhiser IV

Candor

  • Jade N Case
  • Arika N Cicci
  • Bryanna S Kellogg
  • Shannon L Nedrow
  • Matthew A Troeger

Cazenovia

  • Harold Komar

Cincinnatus

  • Mickaela E Combs
  • Chelsea A Gerrard
  • Elizabeth R Golicki
  • Suzanne M Golicki
  • Lyndsee N Mott
  • Amanda F Thornton

Clay

  • Hannah G DeBoer
  • Jordan Spoor

Cortland

  • Kelly S Aylesworth
  • Jessica M Badman
  • Destany C Beebe
  • Sarah Arline Brown
  • Jodie L Bush
  • Leah E Calzolaio
  • Christina C Carden
  • Lisa J Christian
  • Fredrick P Coon
  • Chad M Dann
  • Kimberley S Earley
  • Christina R Ferrer
  • Brandy L Fetterly
  • Marcia L Ford
  • Katherine I Fuller
  • John T Funka
  • Melinda Gardner
  • Brittany L Genson
  • Amy A Grantham
  • Allyssa M Harris
  • Jonathan P Hatala
  • Samantha Hoyt
  • Jennifer M Kelly
  • Kayla Kelsey
  • Cortney M King
  • Claudia M Kolts
  • Clarissa M LaFavor
  • Rayann P LeFever
  • Terri L Maxson
  • James A McLorn
  • Kaili A Mello
  • Katherine B Mikitiuk
  • Melissa Milea
  • Andrew C Moffitt
  • Kelley Marie Mulvana
  • Ashley N Nageotte
  • Yulia V Nikulina
  • Olena Okolita
  • Donald A Parks III
  • Aric Peery
  • Serena J Pickert-Bryan
  • Bailey J Potter
  • Jessica Lynn Rigg
  • Gradon D Ryan
  • Brad G Sciera
  • Heidi S Shaffer
  • Alyssa K Timmons
  • Antonio F Triana
  • Michael E Twining
  • Collins M Van Gorden
  • Danielle Wallis
  • Monique C Walsh
  • Vadim Yanchuk
  • Kristin Yarnell

Dryden

  • Grasen D Alexander
  • Dimitriy S Bindas
  • Victoria M Goehner
  • Matthew S Horton
  • Cheyenne L Jackson
  • Cameron C Jessop
  • Iurii I Kovalenko
  • McKayla G Macomber
  • McKenna Macomber
  • Jessica Meyer
  • May L Olson
  • Aaron D Pamel
  • Nick Ruskin
  • Sarah E Schug
  • Nadia Shevchenko

Dundee

  • Nolan P Ernhout

Elizabethtown

  • William J Tomkins

Elmira

  • Tara Clark

Endicott

  • Gary L Hartford II
  • Victoria A Mattarell
  • Alexander M Whitney
  • Erica L Young

Fabius

  • Elisabeth A Olcott

Fairport

  • Holly Carson

Fredonia

  • Matthew Stafford

Freeville

  • Ernest L Bell
  • Lyle A Cohen
  • Meredith A Czymmek
  • Aaron L Fairbank
  • Alexandra R Griffin
  • Ashleigh L Knight
  • Joseph Knight
  • Hannah E Leach
  • Troy Adam Sutfin
  • Kate Velez

Groton

  • Marcia L Beckley
  • Chelsea C Benson
  • Paul L Bogart
  • Tristen E Buckley
  • Jennifer M Coleman
  • Melanie A Dykeman
  • Peter L Empson
  • Kasondra M Golden
  • Indigo Sky Holohan-Kantor
  • Peter V Karandeyev
  • Korissa Kinney
  • Victoria L Meigs
  • Timothy C T Sanford
  • Alex M Shehu
  • Thomas J Stelick
  • Ezekiel J Wright
  • Domenick F Zerilli

Groveland

  • Michael A Love

Hamburg

  • Trevor Dobrzenski

Hastings-On-Hudson

  • Joseph F Tarricone

Highland

  • Alex M Baglieri

Homer

  • Raelyn H Beiter
  • Janel L Burhans
  • Janette M Button
  • Kelsi R Carlisle
  • Sarah E Covey
  • Nicholas A Falso
  • Amanda C Gray
  • Jessica H Miller
  • Jennifer M Wendel

Horseheads

  • Victoria L Evans

Interlaken

  • Samuel A Schmidt

Ithaca

  • Tamara Acquah
  • Scott R Adams II
  • Melissa J Allen
  • Leia Alston
  • Christopher E Bach
  • Erna Bahtic
  • Hannah E Baker
  • Jessica L Baker
  • Shawnee R Baker
  • Andrew Joseph Barnes
  • Kristin L Beierle
  • Sayda Belasco
  • Danielle L Bennett
  • Sarah M Bennett
  • Abigail L Bertonica
  • David A Besag
  • Tanya A Bovt
  • Jessica L Breuhaus
  • Frida Brown
  • Rane Bullion
  • Olanje J Carpenter
  • Elisha D Chaffee
  • Zaccharie Charvolin
  • Rachel I Clabby
  • Malaysia Clark
  • Kathleen M Collins
  • Marguerite E DeLong
  • Geva Dimanche
  • Anna S Doll
  • Kameron M Eddy
  • Stacey K Eddy
  • Nicholas M Evanoski
  • Michael E Evans Jr
  • Shabir Y Ferdows
  • Misha K Foote
  • Jesus A Fuentes
  • Haley V Fuller
  • Benjamin A Gallegos
  • Chanhom l Green
  • Cecilia R Hagen
  • Harrison Haverlock
  • Md Mohshee-Ul Islam
  • Brittney A Jackson
  • Aminatta Y Kah
  • Julian S Kellner-Rogers
  • Michael B Kennedy
  • Tori M Knapp
  • Benjamin J Kornblum
  • Eric Kovatchitch
  • Lillian V Kuhn
  • Selina J Lenetsky
  • Emily A Leonardo
  • Jax Li
  • Joe Li
  • Yan Liang
  • Sheila Littlefield
  • Tabitha Luh
  • Andrew Lytle
  • Noah M Machlin
  • Jeffrey Rocco Marianni
  • Stephanie M Marvin
  • Alexander Abel McSurely-Bradshaw
  • Tigran Mehrabyan
  • Margaret E Mojo
  • Lucas Andrew Moliviatis
  • Michelle L Morris
  • Renee L Morris
  • Mary G Nann
  • Jessica M Nattrass
  • Ludmila P Nikulin
  • Oluwatayo G Odeyemi
  • Brian Okumu
  • Timothy M Poley
  • Elizabeth R Proctor
  • Sydney K Richards
  • Jason P Rossow
  • Neha Saluja
  • Cesar A Santos
  • Adam Scheletsky
  • Lory E Scott
  • Anna Shcherenkov
  • Andrew D Siciliano
  • Elsa Sinurat
  • Patrick W Skawski
  • John T Smieska III
  • Carisa L Smith
  • Erin Smith
  • Chloe S Snyder
  • Tammy L Snyder
  • Melissa L Sprole
  • Amelia J Sturman
  • Liam M Tang
  • Gregory W Thorp
  • Hilina T Tiba
  • Chastity Torres
  • Melissa L Travis
  • Karen E Trible
  • Chad E Trimm
  • Vy T Trinh
  • Geoffrey D Twardokus
  • Matthew Valvo
  • Steven Wallace
  • Zachary O Wilder
  • Hannah G Wilhelm

Jacksonville

  • Heather L Whitaker

Johnson City

  • Tara L Kelsey

Kew Gardens

  • Shion Ishihara

King Ferry

  • Hailey A Cote
  • Kim M Cote

Lansing

  • Natalie P Deis
  • Cortney E Fenner
  • Curtis F Fields
  • Joseph F Knight
  • Kylie McKenna
  • Elisha D Riley
  • Derrick J Ryan
  • Kasey O Schnock
  • Maureen M Stanhope
  • Natalie J Vincent
  • Bobbie J Weaver

Lisle

  • Wendy S Gates

Livingston Manor

  • Rachel Bitjeman

Locke

  • Michael J Friend
  • Jami N Hildreth
  • Jamie Myers
  • Logan A Osterman
  • Betty J Simolo

Lodi

  • Rebeca Kiser

Macedon

  • Nathaniel Burgette

Marathon

  • Sara B Askew
  • Cera A Henninger
  • Valerie A Livingston
  • Rebecca M Pixley
  • Heidi J Russell
  • Kathy Jo K Small
  • Luke Williams

Maybrook

  • Colton A Griffith

McGraw

  • Daniel A. Jones Jr
  • Ethan A Phelps
  • Catherine Ann Ackley
  • CaSandra M Millard
  • Donald L Smith Jr
  • Tesla E Standish

McLean

  • Taylor E Schneider>

Middleburgh

  • Nathan Lamont

Monticello

  • Jessica L Muntz

Montour Falls

  • Callie A Stillman

Moravia

  • Daniel J Bird
  • Shianne T Crandall
  • Nicholas A Jayne
  • Summer R MacAdam Gorham
  • Jordan Rofe

Mount Vernon

  • Malik E Fogg

New York

  • Nichole J Bishop-Pointer
  • Jonathan D Dawson
  • Milka K Grenier
  • Mame B Sylla
  • Justmil Villanueva

Newark Valley

  • Monica A Hallman
  • Heidi L Inderwies
  • Kameron M Kelsey
  • Asa G Kerr
  • Kerra Lynn Matolka
  • James Richard

Newfield

  • Tamarynde L Cacciotti
  • Jacob J Gelber
  • Taylor A Hoffman
  • Steven F Hughes
  • Brianna Lee Hulbert
  • Brianna M Jacobs
  • Clea Louise Lockwood-Wynns
  • Cassandra Rae Martin
  • Ann Owens
  • Javier E Rosa Padro Jr
  • Michael E Shipman
  • Athena H Steinkraus
  • Michael J Yaples

Norwich

  • Mary Catherine King
  • Ryan E McCloskey
  • Kati Williams

Odessa

  • Jane K Whiting

Oneida

  • Callaghan D Capelle

Oneonta

  • Kidane Haile
  • Brigid D Jackson

Owego

  • Amy M Bennett
  • Dakota R Delaney-Hammond
  • Max H Della Pia
  • Brittney P Gradel
  • Jordan R Jardine

Penn Yan

  • Adam Killebrew

Pine Valley

  • Daniel J Brown

Pitcher

  • Caitlyn Blanchard

Port Leyden

  • David L Weaver

Richford

  • Jordan L Evans
  • Jennifer L Gorsline
  • Jodie M Mead
  • Stephan Mead
  • Makayla L Pirger
  • Cassandra R Robinson

Rochester

  • James W Hernandez
  • Jeffrey B Marlatt

Salamanca

  • Sonny A Buffalo

Savannah

  • Adria S Brunn

Scarsdale

  • Cecilia S Faringer-Perez

Schenectady

  • Melissa A Jeffers

Seneca Falls

  • Jared Coffey
  • Fletcher Reese

Sidney

  • Jacob A DeLay

Slaterville Springs

  • Siarra M Hicks

Smithboro

  • Kathryn L Gillule

Spencer

  • Lori J Backus
  • Eugene T Beavers
  • Samantha J Hubbard
  • Ashley K King
  • Sharinne Sukhnanand

Syracuse

  • Aaron Fuoco
  • Nina K Onoff

Three Mile Bay

  • Ryan Siesto

Trumansburg

  • Amir B Ali
  • Emily H Austic-Loz
  • Lauren E Conlon
  • Rayanna L Harmon
  • Francis R Heptig
  • Nora E Hones
  • Alexander C Kenney
  • Christina A Mente
  • Sarah E Murray
  • Dakota A Rose
  • Sarah Saxon
  • Alexander J Skezas
  • Thomas J Staples

Truxton

  • Maria Arnold
  • Paulo G Dos Santos
  • Kiersten M Hawks
  • Daniel J L'Hommedieu

Vestal

  • Elizabeth M Keefe

Walden

  • Hunter G Feasel

Waverly

  • Valerie M Sjoblom

Wawarsing

  • Emma Augustine

West Islip

  • Jessica M Smith

West Winfield

  • Alex C Hoover

White Plains

  • Akeil K Davis

Whitney Point

  • Michaela A Sutton

Willseyville

  • Cody B Harris

Windsor

  • Chelsey M VanZandt

Other States

Arcadia, California

  • Thet M Khine

San Diego, California

  • Erika C Skinner

Alexandria, Louisiana

  • David Folarin

Auburn, Michigan

  • Christian S Schoenherr

Jackson, New Jersey

  • Matthew M Russo

Bushkill, Pennsylvania

  • Amber L Lisco

Elkland, Pennsylvania

  • Seth T Hager

Pottsville, Pennsylvania

  • Carrollynn Schwent

Quakertown, Pennsylvania

  • Kaitlyn Rude

Out of Country

Barbados

  • Marissa L Hope

China

  • Weikang Jia
  • Yiyao Wei

Ecuador

  • Rafaela Moreno Crespo

Honduras

  • Marco Antonio Zelaya Reina

Hong Kong

  • Kai Ching Suen

Iran

  • Parastou Bahrami-Taghanaki

Ireland

  • Flora L Jeffcock-Schwartz

Peru

  • Jorge Luis Reategui Ravina

 


CollegeNow Receives National Reaccreditation

May 6, 2016

Tompkins Cortland Community College’s CollegeNow has been reaccredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP). The only national accrediting body for concurrent enrollment partnerships, NACEP assures programs like CollegeNow adhere to the highest standards. The NACEP accreditation lasts for seven years. CollegeNow was initially accredited in 2009 and remains one of only 98 programs nationwide to receive the designation.

“This signals to our partner high schools, students, and families that the rigor and quality of CollegeNow courses meet the expectations of Tompkins Cortland Community College,” said CollegeNow Director Victoria Zeppelin. NACEP awards accreditation to programs only after a comprehensive peer review. Applicants must document how the college implements NACEP’s national standards for program quality in the areas of curriculum, faculty, students, assessment, and program evaluation.

“Tompkins Cortland Community College has a long history of working closely with school districts to enhance the opportunity and accessibility of education for students in Central New York,” said Zeppelin. CollegeNow, which is the largest concurrent enrollment program in the SUNY system, creates opportunities for high school students to earn college credit right in their own high school. “This program enables students to take challenging, college-level courses in high school, strengthen the transition from high school to college, and earn college credits that can be used at Tompkins Cortland or transferred to many colleges and universities in New York and throughout the country.”

Unlike Advanced Placement, where college credit is determined by performance on one high-stakes exam, students earn college credit based on their performance over the course of a complete college-level course. Concurrent enrollment instructors are high school teachers who become authorized adjuncts of Tompkins Cortland Community College, teach their course to the College’s master course syllabi, and use college-level texts. Each district has a contract with the College which states the high school will pay various costs associated with the program, including instructor salaries, facility use, tutoring, and advising services. The value of these services provided by the district completely offsets the tuition charge so there is no net cost to the school district or the students.

“Students who participate in the CollegeNow program not only reap academic and financial advantage, but also strengthen their college applications and develop tools for college success,” said Zeppelin, who was appointed chair of the NACEP Accreditation Commission earlier this month. “By taking courses through CollegeNow, high school students gain an understanding of college-level expectations and further develop the college-ready skillset necessary for academic success in higher education.”

This year, 4,814 students across 59 high schools are registered to earn a total of 31,839 college credits through CollegeNow. Last year, 2,186 high school seniors graduated with a total of 23,621 credits from Tompkins Cortland community College. Several students earned more than a semester’s worth of college credit: 567 seniors earned at least 15 credits and 159 earned at least 30 credits. Last year, 19 students completed the requirements and earned an Associate’s degree while in high school, thanks to the CollegeNow program.

To learn more about CollegeNow, please visit tompkinscortland.edu/CollegeNow or email CollegeNow@TC3.edu.


College Celebrates 47th Commencement

May 26, 2016

You are a hero, and the world is better for having you in it. Those were among the messages delivered to the class of 2016 during commencement ceremonies at Tompkins Cortland Community College Thursday. The College celebrated its 47th commencement in front of a packed crowd of more than 2,000 people in the College's gymnasium.

The class of 2016 consists of 689 graduates, including student trustee Olu Roberts, who offered remarks during the ceremony. “This may be the second degree for some of you, and this may be the first degree for others,” said Roberts. “For those like myself who have broken the barriers in being the first one for your family, a special congratulations!”

Roberts, who will attend Cornell University in the fall, thanked his professors and fellow classmates. He said it’s important graduates realize the possibilities now open to them. “Take advantage of the educational opportunities available to you,” said Roberts. “Some will call this degree just a piece of paper. That piece of paper can make your entire family better. You have so many opportunities living here in America. Make use of these opportunities while you have the chance.”

The main address was delivered by Justine Lewis, a member of the College’s class of 2008. Lewis, a Berkshire native who followed her time at Tompkins Cortland by earning a bachelor’s degree from Ithaca College and two master’s degrees from Cornell University, said each graduate can thank the support of the heroes in their lives. But she also called each graduate a hero. “Having the courage to show up for life each day, whether to a class or to your job or for a friend who just needs your ear for a while, is the very definition of what a hero means to me,” she said. “It takes courage to live out each day and be in each and every moment. You are the hero in that story.”

Lewis, who works for the U.S. Agency for International Development, told the graduates she remembers sitting in their seats a few years back, unsure of the future. So, she wrote a letter to the class of 2016, saying they are already a success and urging them to take a moment to believe in someone and to dance their own dance. “I’m not sure where each of us will end up, where we will be living in ten years, but I do know this: I know each of you are dedicated individuals, have learned so much, and accomplished big, big things,” said Lewis. “To the class of 2016, be a success, believe in people, and, most important, be you and dance. You know how.”

College President Carl Haynes also addressed the graduates, congratulating them on rising to the challenge. "We know that all of you have dealt with challenges in your pursuit of this degree, and we know that all of you have overcome those challenges,” said Haynes. “You were brilliant, you were funny, you were tired, creative, frustrated, triumphant. You didn’t just punch a clock and get through. You rewrote your life and now you have a degree to show for it,” said Haynes. “But you have so much more. You have an education. So again, I say congratulations.”


Student Worker Appreciation Week

The National Student Employment Association (NSEA) has declared that the second week in April each year be set aside to recognize the value of student employees. This year April 11 through 15 was the official Student Employment Appreciation Week for 2016.

The purpose of this week is to: enhance awareness of student employment and its important role in the higher education experience; recognize students who contribute to the campus and community through their work while attending college; and thank the employers who hire students for part-time position which enhance the student employment program.

Congratulations to the Student Employee of the Year: Kimberly Jenney (Student Ambassador) and Runner up: Victoria Goehner (Fitness Center).

student employee appreciation dinner

Thank you to our community sponsors: AGAVA, American Food and Vending, Applebee’s, Byrne Dairy, Collegetown Bagels, Doug’s Fish Fry, Follett Book Store, Homer Men and Boys, Ithaca Bakery, Kinney’s Drugs, Pizza & Bones, Rite Aid, Rulloff’s Restaurant, Schwan’s, Style and Smiles Hair Salon, Target, TOPS Markets, and Wal-Mart.


State Approves College to Provide Social Worker Continuing Education

December 9, 2015

Tompkins Cortland Community College has been approved to offer state-mandated continuing education programs for social workers. The classes will provide continuing education credits for Licensed Master Social Workers (LMSW) and Licensed Clinical Social Workers (LCSW), satisfying new registration requirements from the New York State Education Department.

"We are thrilled to be approved by the state to provide these continuing education opportunities,” said the College’s Strategic Corporate and Community Partnerships Director Martha Hubbard. "With the change in state licensing laws we’re very happy to be able to provide a local, cost-efficient opportunity for this important group of professionals to obtain the continuing education credits they need.”

Beginning this year, all LMSW and LCSW must complete 36 hours of approved continuing education courses for each three-year registration period, with no more than 12 hours consisting of self-study. With the state approval of Tompkins Cortland as a provider, four courses will be offered in the spring of 2016 through TC3 Biz, the professional development and business training arm of the College.

• Hidden Loss: A Therapeutic Intervention for Children with an Incarcerated Patient of Caregiver. February 17

• Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis Using DSM 5. March 29

• Facing New Challenges: Contemporary Ethical Considerations for Social Work Practitioners. April 12

• Treatment Strategies for Working with the Dually Diagnosed Patient in a Mental Health Clinic. June 8

For more information on each class, including how to register, contact TC3 Biz at 607.844.6586 or biz@TC3.edu.


College's Martha Hubbard Wins Statewide Award

November 23, 2015

Martha Hubbard with the CEANY award
Tompkins Cortland Community College's Martha Hubbard with her CEANY award

Tompkins Cortland Community College’s Director of Corporate and Community Partnerships has been recognized on the state level for her years of outstanding service to the College and lifelong learners in the community. Martha Hubbard has been selected as the “Outstanding Experienced Continuing Education Professional” by the Continuing Education Association of New York (CEANY). She was presented with the award at the annual conference in Saratoga earlier this month.

The award is designed to honor leaders who strive toward the highest levels of personal and professional accomplishment and who excel in continuing education. Hubbard certainly qualifies, with nearly 20 years of experience in the field at Tompkins Cortland Community College. She oversees TC3 Biz, which supports local organizations and businesses through professional development workshops and customized training, reaching more than 3,500 people each year. She also is the primary link between the College and local employers, serving as the College’s point person for START-UP NY and REV Ithaca Startup Works.

“CEANY has meant so much to me over my career. Members from both SUNY and CUNY two and four-year campuses have always generously shared ideas, approaches, and contacts for providing quality continuing education programming,” said Hubbard. “I was honored to be given this award from my colleagues from across the state.”

Hubbard has been on the CEANY executive board for more than ten years, including two years as vice present and a year as president. Statewide, CEANY includes more than 500 members representing all public higher education across the state, including both SUNY and CUNY two and four-year institutions.


College Wins $15K Grant to Help Tioga County Students

October 27, 2015

Tompkins Cortland Community College has been awarded a $15,000 grant from the Owego-based Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation. The money will be used to provide financial assistance to Tioga County residents attending Tompkins Cortland during the 2015-16 academic year. Since awarding its first grant to the College in 1986, the Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation has provided more than $485,000 to TC3 students.

“The Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation has long been a strong supporter of the College and our students from Tioga County,” said Julie Gerg, the College’s development coordinator. “They have helped hundreds of students through the years, making a positive impact on their lives. We are extremely grateful for the partnership we have shared with the Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation and look forward to continuing to work together to help students from Tioga County succeed.”

All the money from the grant goes directly to students. To be eligible, a student must be a Tioga County resident, must maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 while enrolled in a degree program, and must demonstrate financial need. Grant size is based on need, but typically range from $400 to $1,000 per year.

The Mildred Faulkner Truman foundation's mission is to practice responsible stewardship of the charitable trust of its benefactress, Mildred Faulkner Truman, by providing worthwhile grants to qualified charitable organizations which enhance and benefit the residents of Tioga County. Truman was born in Owego in 1897, and lived in Owego until her death in 1983. She served as a director of the Owego National Bank as well as the Tioga County Historical Society. Through successful investments, a substantial estate was accumulated, and upon her death, The Foundation was established.

More information on the aid available to students as a result of the Mildred Faulkner Truman grant can be obtained from the Alumni and Development Office at 607.844.8222, Ext. 4369.


TC3 Biz Secures $71,500 for Local Workforce Training

October 21, 2015

Employees at five organizations in Tompkins and Cortland counties will be upgrading their skills and improving their job performance, thanks to $71,500 worth of grants Tompkins Cortland Community College has secured from the SUNY Community College Workforce Development Training program. The competitive grants are designed to provide workforce development training programs to businesses and organizations to promote and encourage the development of new businesses in the state, and to create and retain employment opportunities in the state and local community. Locally, the training is done by TC3 Biz, the professional development and business training arm of the College.

This year’s grants from the SUNY Workforce Development Grant Program bring the College’s ten-year total to more than $800,000 in grants. Combined, the grants have provided for training to more than 7,200 people in Tompkins and Cortland counties.

TC3’s Strategic Corporate and Community Partnerships Director Martha Hubbard worked with local organizations to design training programs aligned with critical business needs, and then applied for the training grants. "A crucial part of the service we provide to our community is assistance in securing training grants," said Hubbard. "We work with organizations to determine needs, and then customize training programs to address those needs. With the programs being partially funded through the SUNY grants, the training is provided to the organizations at a fraction of what it normally would cost. It allows these organizations to afford the training they need to continue to thrive and remain vital in our community."

The training supported by the SUNY grants will assist five organizations and will be completed by June 2016.

The grant award recipients, location; grant total; and brief description are:
Byrne Hollow Farm, Cortland; $18,367.49; yogurt and fermented dairy products training
Envisage, Ithaca; $6,589.44; team development training
BorgWarner, Ithaca; $13,981.97; supervisory development
Forkey Construction and Fabrication, Cortland; $15,607.02; machinist training
Stork H & E Turboblading, Ithaca; $16,954.08; machinist training

More information on customized training, non-credit professional development workshops, and grant funding is available by contacting TC3 Biz at 607.844.6586 or MMH@TC3.edu.


CollegeNow Adds Six New Partner Schools

August 19, 2015

Tompkins Cortland Community College’s CollegeNow program has added six new school districts to its list of partner schools that offer concurrent enrollment classes to its students. Delaware Academy Central School District, Downsville Central School District, George Junior Republic Union Free School District, Morris Central School District, Stockbridge Valley Central School District, and Watkins Glen Central School District join the growing list of school districts in New York State offering their students the chance to earn TC3 college and high school credit at the same time by taking classes in their own high school. For the 2015-16 school year, there are now 58 school districts partnering with CollegeNow.

“We’re excited to work with these six new districts to expand their offerings while serving their students’ needs,” said TC3’s CollegeNow Director Victoria Zeppelin. “The opportunities provided through this partnership will save the families money, expose the students to college-level work, and help prepare students for the transition to college and career. We’re thrilled TC3’s CollegeNow can work with these districts for the benefit of the students.”

The largest concurrent enrollment program in the SUNY system, TC3’s CollegeNow is accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships. A part of TC3 for more than 35 years, CollegeNow creates opportunities for high school students to earn real college credit with no tuition costs. The classes are taught by high school faculty that have been approved to teach the TC3 college class. When successfully completed, the student has earned credit towards a high school diploma as well as starting a college transcript. Over the years, high school students have earned more than 25 million dollars’ worth of college credit for free, many without ever stepping on foot of a college campus.

To learn more about TC3’s CollegeNow, please visit TC3.edu/CollegeNow.


Officers Elected for TC3 Board of Trustees

July 20, 2015

There will be no change to the leadership of the Tompkins Cortland Community College Board of Trustees this year. At its annual meeting, Elizabeth Burns was re-elected chair of the board for her fifth one-year term. Burns has been a member of the board since 2008 and has served as the chair since 2011. She represents Cortland County.

Raymond Schlather was re-elected the vice chair. He also joined the Board in 2008, but representing Tompkins County. This is his fifth year as vice chair.

Judy Davison was re-elected treasurer for the fifth year. Davison has been a trustee since 2007, representing Cortland County.

Roxann Buck, remains on the board's executive committee. She was originally appointed a trustee by the Tompkins County Board of Representatives in 1990. She served as chair from 2003 to 2011 and has continued on the executive committee the last four years. Two TC3 staff members also were appointed to positions with Board.

Cathy Northrop was re-appointed clerk of the board. Northrop, assistant to the president, has been clerk since 1996.

Lisa Doran was re-appointed deputy clerk of the board. Doran, assistant to the dean of operations and enrollment management, has been deputy clerk since 1991.


Ray Schlather Reappointed to TC3 Board of Trustees

July 14, 2015

Ray Schlather of Ithaca has been reappointed to the Tompkins Cortland Community College Board of Trustees. Schlather was originally appointed by the governor's office in 2008 to a term that expired this year. His new term runs through June 30, 2022.

“TC3 plays a vital role in the educational, cultural, and economic development of this region. I am honored to be a part of such a dynamic institution,” said Schlather, who has been the vice chair of the Board of Trustees for the last four years. “With our student body drawn from across the spectrum, our dedicated staff, and our innovative leadership, we make a real difference at many levels in this part of the world.”

Schlather is a partner in the Ithaca law firm Schlather, Stumbar, Parks & Salk. He is a former member of Ithaca's Common Council and Ithaca’s Board of Public Works as well as being a former president of the Tompkins County Bar Association. He earned his bachelor's degree from St. Vincent College (Penn.) and his law degree from Cornell University.

The Tompkins Cortland Community College Board of Trustees consists of 10 members, including a student trustee elected by the student body. The governor appoints four trustees, two each from Tompkins and Cortland Counties; the Cortland County Legislature appoints two; and the Tompkins County Legislature appoints three.


Leadership Cortland Recruiting for 2015-16

July 7, 2015

Cortland County residents looking for the opportunity to develop leadership skills and contribute to community vitality by serving on board and committees should consider taking part in the 2015-16 Leadership Cortland program. Applications are now being accepted for the program, which is a joint effort of the College and the Cortland County Chamber of Commerce.

Leadership Cortland, founded in 1996, brings together diverse groups of citizens who share the interests of developing their leadership skills and improving their community. With representatives from a cross section of business, industry, education, non-profit and government organizations, Leadership Cortland educates about the strengths and challenges of Cortland County while teaching about individual styles, leadership, and teamwork. In addition to monthly sessions and a two-day retreat, participants also work as teams to develop community action projects designed to improve the county. Past projects have included Backpacks for Foster Kids, the development of Chill-A-Bration, PB&J Weekend Food program, and the creation of EPICC – Empowered Professionals of Cortland County.

"We have surveyed our Leadership alumni and learned that the vast majority are now serving, or have served, on local boards," says Leadership Cortland Director Martha Hubbard. "Many have been involved in founding a new organization or board in our area. Several others have assumed leadership roles on area committees and projects since graduating from the program, while others have utilized their new skills and knowledge to advance in their workplace."

People interested in Leadership Cortland should contact Hubbard at 607.844.6586 or visit www.leadershipcortland.org for the application and more information.


Tompkins Cortland Community College and Coltivare Honored by Chamber of Commerce

February 13, 2015

Chamber video honoring TC3

Tompkins Cortland Community College and Coltivare were honored together as a Distinguished Business of the Year by the Tompkins County Chamber of Commerce at it’s Annual Awards Dinner recently. According to the Chamber, a distinguished business demonstrates investment in the business through job growth, physical expansion, or significant capital investment; makes a significant impact on the community (this year or over a long period of time); is resilient and/or a “pillar” of the community; and demonstrates a commitment to the Chamber mission. The nominations received for TC3 highlighted our Farm to Bistro initiative and our commitment to numerous projects that have improved our community. A nominator also mentioned that the initiative demonstrated our commitment to local agriculture and training, as well as providing significant new educational opportunities in Culinary Arts, Sustainable Farming and Food Systems, and in our existing programs in Wine Marketing and Hotel and Restaurant Management.


TC3 Wins $15,000 Grant to Support Tioga County Students

November 11, 2014

Tompkins Cortland Community College has been awarded a $15,000 grant from the Owego-based Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation. The money will be used to provide financial assistance to Tioga County residents attending TC3 during the 2014-15 academic year. Since awarding its first grant to the College in 1986, the Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation has provided more than $470,000 to TC3 students.

All the money from the grant goes directly to students. To be eligible, a student must be a Tioga County resident, must maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 while enrolled in a degree program, and must demonstrate financial need. Grant size is based on need, but typically range from $400 to $1,000 per year.

The Mildred Faulkner Truman foundation's mission is to practice responsible stewardship of the charitable trust of its benefactress, Mildred Faulkner Truman, by providing worthwhile grants to qualified charitable organizations which enhance and benefit the residents of Tioga County. Truman was born in Owego in 1897, and lived in Owego until her death in 1983. She served as a director of the Owego National Bank as well as the Tioga County Historical Society. Through successful investments, a substantial estate was accumulated, and upon her death, The Foundation was established.

More information on the aid available to students as a result of the Mildred Faulkner Truman grant can be obtained from the TC3 Alumni and Development Office at 607.844.8222, Ext. 4369.


New Exhibit at Tompkins County Public Library Features TC3 Student Work

September 24, 2014

A new exhibit on display at the Tompkins County Public Library features work done by a digital photography class at Tompkins Cortland Community College. Montage Histories: Tompkins County, New York through Photographs 1864-2014 features images of sites in Tompkins County, both as they appeared in the 1860s and how they look today. The exhibit, which is part of the celebration of the sesquicentennial of the Tompkins County Public Library, runs now through December 30. An opening reception will be held Friday, September 26 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the library at 101 East Green Street in Ithaca.

 

The show features the work of students in Assistant Professor Harry Littell’s Spring 2014 Advanced Digital Photography class. Littell, who is the chair of TC3’s photography program, had students create photomontages that combined historic photographs of significant buildings, places, and landscapes with current ones they took of the same locations. The students chose archival images from the History Center in Tompkins County, found and photographed the same view, and then combined them in a montage that highlighted aspects of the past in a contemporary context.

 

Twenty-three pieces of work are on display as part of the exhibit at the library. An exhibit catalogue was created featuring these images and additional pieces created by Littell and his students. The catalogue also includes descriptions of each image, providing a historical narrative as well as details on each featured location. The text in the catalogue was researched and written by Bret Leraul and Christine Yao, graduate students at Cornell University’s Society for the Humanities.

The catalogue is available for purchase online at www.magcloud.com.

Examples of the artwork on display
Photo by Cassidy Backus
Photo by Cassidy Backus

Photo by Jennifer Rose Hoyt
Photo by Jennifer Rose Hoyt

Photo by Cassidy Backus
Photo by Cassidy Backus


Cornell, IC and TC3 Launch New Downtown Ithaca Incubator Project

January 16, 2014

Over the past year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has challenged higher education institutions across the state to become even more energetic partners in the region’s economic revitalization.

Now, Cornell University, in collaboration with Ithaca College and Tompkins Cortland Community College, is answering that call by channeling state support and the expertise of these institutions to create the Downtown Ithaca Incubator.

The site, just steps from The Commons in the Carey Building at 314 E. State St., will bring rising entrepreneurs from throughout the area – not just those already affiliated with these schools – to downtown Ithaca to work, learn and create a new thriving business hub within walking distance of the many resources available in the heart of Tompkins County. Working with building owner Travis Hyde Properties, the higher education partners hope to have the Ithaca incubator open for business in a fully remodeled second floor of the Carey Building in the summer of 2014. Plans now being developed by Travis Hyde call for the expansion of the Downtown Ithaca Incubator into a new third floor by early 2015, creating a 9,000-square-foot focal point for entrepreneurial activity.

“Cornell has campuses, programs and relationships that extend around the world, but Ithaca is our home. We thrive only if it thrives,” said Cornell President David Skorton. “Taking up the governor’s challenge to help spur more economic activity in the region is a natural extension of our long commitment to this community and our land-grant mission, and we are particularly thrilled to be joining Ithaca College and TC3 to make this downtown incubator a reality.”

The incubator project brings Ithaca College full circle, marking a symbolic return to its downtown roots.

“This venture is the very definition of a win-win situation – both academically and economically,” said Tom Rochon, president of Ithaca College. “Our students will have an outstanding opportunity to work alongside and learn from budding entrepreneurs, helping to inspire their own entrepreneurial spirit. As a partnership among the campuses and between the public and private sectors, the incubator can serve as a model for generating regional economic development opportunities.”

The goal of the new incubator – to unlock entrepreneurial potential and provide a thriving business creation hub in downtown Ithaca – is also a natural extension of the business and economic development mission that has been part of TC3 since its birth.

“Tompkins Cortland Community College has long been an innovator in supporting public/private partnerships. This is evidenced by our investment at TC3 Tioga Place, and by our commitment to offering programs, such as our popular Business Administration and International Business degrees, as well as our new Entrepreneurship degree, that prepare future business owners for success,” said TC3 President Cal Haynes. “The incubator is a fitting extension of these efforts, and we are truly excited about its launch and thrilled to be part of this collaboration with Cornell University and Ithaca College.”

The purpose of the Downtown Ithaca Incubator is to provide a focal point for entrepreneurial activity – a first answer to budding entrepreneurs who ask, “Where can I go for help?” A key use of the space will be for programming and events that support entrepreneurship and the local and regional entrepreneurial ecosystem. The space will also be the home of incubator tenant companies, who will have access to work space, mentoring and resources. Companies will be evaluated for tenancy in the Ithaca incubator without regard to organizational affiliation and will be eligible for tax incentives through New York State. Upon graduation from an incubator, companies can take advantage of abundant available commercial and office space downtown, and many will qualify for additional tax incentive support through the new Start-UP NY program.

The Ithaca incubator also is one “node” in the new Southern Tier Innovation Hot Spot, a regional economic development plan that received a three-year, $250,000-per-year award in December from the state’s Regional Economic Development Council. The total cost of the renovation, furnishing and future expansion of the Carey Building is estimated at $3.5 million. Funding to make this possible was secured through the State’s Consolidated Funding Application process for $1 million, with the remaining $2.5 million being invested by Travis Hyde.

Travis Hyde is also supporting the Ithaca Incubator through rent abatements.

“I love the idea that we are giving new life and purpose to a handsome old building that is a significant element in the fabric of downtown Ithaca,” Travis Hyde Properties President Frost Travis said.

Operational costs are being supported by the partner higher education institutions. Over time, fees paid by tenants will partially offset those costs. As is required under the state programs, the Carey Building will remain on the local property tax rolls.


Major Solar Project Coming to TC3

December 6, 2013

Pending final approval, a large solar power plant that will meet approximately 90% of Tompkins Cortland Community College’s electricity needs will be coming to the Dryden campus. Thanks to an agreement with SEC LHNY Solar One, LLC, a subsidiary of Smart Energy Capital, LLC, which secured a grant from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), TC3 is in line to take a huge step towards being completely independent of grid-supplied electricity. The project furthers TC3’s commitment to reliance on sustainable energy sources, eliminating greenhouse emissions, and reducing its carbon footprint. It also presents the potential for significant utility savings for TC3, all at no cost to the College.

The solar plant will consist of 8,676 solar panels, covering an area of roughly 10 acres. The farm will be located on land owned by the Foundation and leased by the College, just across Bahar Drive from the main campus building. It is estimated the project will produce more than three million kilowatt hours of power each year, which is roughly 90% of the annual usage on TC3’s main campus.

The start of the project is still dependent on successful completion of site studies and approval from the town of Dryden, which are expected. “We are fully confident that this project will move forward,” said TC3 President Carl Haynes, noting the project fits in with the commitment the College made when he signed the President’s Climate Commitment in March 2008. “We are making a real investment in moving off the grid, and I’m delighted that we are able to do it without having to use College resources.” In fact, the agreement with Solar One should lead to savings for the College.

“Based on our best current projections, the first-year savings will be approximately $30,000,” said TC3 Director of Facilities James Turner. “After that, if traditional utility rates continue to climb, I anticipate we will see additional savings over what we would have been spending.”

It is estimated this project will have a direct benefit to the environment in the form of the abatement of more than 890 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year. “This, combined with our efforts to decrease energy use over the past 10 years, will dramatically decrease our carbon footprint,” said Turner, noting that the College has already decreased energy use by nearly 50% during that time period, despite increasing the size of its facilities.

The solar project will be constructed by Borrego Solar and operated by Solar One, with TC3 as the beneficiary of the solar power. Depending on the timing of the permitting and final approvals, the solar farm should be operating, and providing for the majority of TC3’s electricity needs, sometime in 2014.


Digital Photography Students Exhibit to Benefit Finger Lakes Land Trust

November 19, 2013

Digital photography students at Tompkins Cortland Community College are putting on a show of their work to benefit the Finger Lakes Land Trust. “Hidden in Plain Sight” will be on exhibit at the Main Street Groton Gallery from December 7 to 22. The show features landscape photographs of the preserves of the Finger Lakes Land Trust. An opening reception will be held Saturday, December 7 from 5 to 8 p.m.

The students are in ART 222: Advanced Digital Photography, taught by Harry Littell, assistant professor and chair of TC3’s photography department. Under Littell’s guidance, the students collaborated this fall on a project to photograph some of the preserves that form the Land Trust. This exhibit reflects their interpretations of their favorite sites across the changing season.

All works available for purchase, with 80% of sales being donated to the Land Trust. The gallery is located at 105 Main Street in Groton. Gallery hours are 1 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Photo of Etna Preserve by TC3 student Ray Helmke

Opening reception invitation


Big Pink/Big Blue Tops $10K Raised in 2013

May 14, 2013

Now in its fifth year, the Tompkins Cortland Community College “Big Pink” fundraiser has reached a significant milestone. The 2013 edition of the “Big Pink” see-saw marathon, which now also features the “Big Blue” dodgeball tournament, took in more than $10,000 for the first time. The 2013 fundraising total was $10,449, bringing the five-year total to $35,625 raised. All the money raised goes to The Cancer Services Program of Cortland and Tompkins Counties.

The 2013 editions of “Big Pink” and “Big Blue” were held on April 5. This was the first time the single-year fundraising total had topped $10,000. The previous best year was 2012, with $8,531 raised.

As has been the case each year, the events were supported by TC3 students, staff, alums, and community members. “Big Pink” and “Big Blue” are organized by the TC3 College Entertainment Board.


Food Drive Delivers for Local Pantry

December 4, 2012

The annual campus-wide food drive kicked off on Thursday, October 25th with a roller skating event held in the Student Center. After that, there was a frenzy of activity including filling purple shopping bags, hauling in cans, bake sales, raffles, CANstruction, donating money in pickle jars and writing checks. In addition to the two truck/van loads delivered the week after Thanksgiving, a few more cartons of food and $1,300 in money was handed over today. Once again we overwhelmed our friends at the Dryden Kitchen Cupboard.

In November, the Cupboard served 1385 individuals. The assistance we provide in helping to feed the hungry in our community is priceless and very much appreciated. Thank you all for your efforts!